Vidhu Vinod Chopra’s “Broken Horses”

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This is Vidhu Chopra’s next directorial project and his début Hollywood venture.  The cast includes Vincent D’Onofrio, Anton Yelchin, Chris Marquette, Maria Velverde, Sean Patrick Flanery and Thomas Jane. The screenplay for the film has been written by Chopra and Abhijat Joshi (of 3 Idiots and Lage Raho Munna Bhai fame).

Rest of the crew includes Oscar nominated Tom Stern (The Hunger Games, Changeling, Million Dollar Baby) as Director of Photography, Toby Corbett (Crossing Over, Bad Lieutenant) as Production Designer and Emmy nominated Mary Vogt (Men In Black 3, Batman Returns) as Costume Designer.

Plot- Set in the shadows of the US-Mexico border gang wars, Broken Horses is an epic thriller about the bonds of brotherhood, the laws of loyalty and the futility of violence.

For more on the film follow the LINK

Vintage Poster- Rocket Tarzan

 

This has to be probably the wackiest and zaniest poster I have come across as far as Hindi cinema is concerned. This piece of sublimity was apparently by a certain B. J. Patel and it was released in 1963. Sadly I can’t locate any transfer/print/copy of the film anywhere

 

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Richard Brody (The New Yorker) on Chan-wook’s ‘Stoker’

 

I have not seen the film yet but this is an exceptionally well-written piece. A certain Chan-wook fan on the blog had promised to me that she would she would write something on it (though she can educate us on the first paragraph, or more specifically the first sentence, of this article.)- regrettably she has not even seen it till now (probably because she is deeply saddened by the news that Josh Brolin is going to do a number on his Korean counterpart in the Spike Lee directed remake of Chan-wook’s Oldboy!).

 

“Stoker”: The Fears and Fantasies of Everyteen

 

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Posted by Richard Brody

March 5, 2013

LINK

“The proper translation for Freud’s 1909 coinage “Familienroman,” or “family romance”—regarding the child’s liberation fantasy of “the replacement of both parents or of the father alone by grander people”—is actually the “family novel,” and there’s something agreeably, engagingly novelistic about “Stoker,” the South Korean director Park Chan-wook’s incursion into a cushy corner of Connecticut and the tangled-up desires, dreams, memories, and impulses of one long-deluded teen-age girl, India Stoker (played by Mia Wasikowska). What the movie most resembles is a young-adult novel, of the sort that was the subject of controversy a couple of years ago for being “too dark.” For all the movie’s melodramatic twists, hyperbolic doings, and posh surroundings, its substance is very much the fears and fantasies and family loam of Everyteen (in particular, of familiar media versions of teen-age girls).

It starts out as a variation on a theme by Alfred Hitchcock—that of “Shadow of a Doubt” and the arrival of the mysterious, glamorous, seductive, long-absent Uncle Charlie (Matthew Goode). But where Hitchcock brings the uncle into a stable home that he then sets on its ear, Park and the screenwriter Wentworth Miller (with contributions by Erin Cressida Wilson) catch the family at a moment of utter vulnerability: India has just lost her father (Dermot Mulroney), with whom she was very close. Charlie, whom she had never met, finally shows up at the sumptuous and isolated family estate and ingratiates himself, rapidly and pressingly, with his brother’s widow (Nicole Kidman).

Things are quickly revealed to be even worse than they seem, as Charlie takes decisive steps to edge out of the picture anyone—the longtime housekeeper, an elderly great-aunt (Jacki Weaver)—who comes to doubt his motives. At first, it appears as if he covets both his brother’s wife and her fortune, and India becomes suspicious as well—but she also seems flickeringly jealous, and, where the young woman in Hitchcock kept her incestuous fantasies tightly contained, India avows them with a full-throated ecstasy (achieved, as it were, with yet another Hitchcockian touch). Yet the violence to which Uncle Charlie sinks is doubled by India’s own rough, physical response to a bullying classmate’s crude aggression. It’s hard to avoid spoilers at this point, but let’s leave it at this: India discovers that her parents have been concealing something very important regarding her uncle—and, given her emotionally close relationship with him, something very important about herself, about character traits that are a part of her own blood. When the truth comes out, her world is overturned, her monsters are unleashed, and she finds herself without the solid footing of character, self-knowledge, and moral clarity to fight them”…..

 

Read more HERE

 

 

The End of Simplicity- On Doordarshan’s “Farmaan” and the state of Indian TV

This one is for my co-blog owner (DD is the only thing we both seem to agree on. I admit that i had no idea about the serial before she told me about it). I found this article on a blog while randomly surfing online

The End of Simplicty

– By Reema Moudgil

http://unboxedwriters.com/2012/08/the-end-of-simplicity/

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“After years of search on YouTube, I finally stumbled upon Farmaan, a Doordarshan serial directed by Lekh Tandon. Based on the Urdu book Alampanah by Rafia Amin, the serial starring Kanwaljit Singh and Deepika Deshpande was a restless memory that even two decades could not erase. And for good reason. The story telling was honest to the spine of the book as it brought to life Hyderabad’s Nawabi culture in the throes of change, financial challenges, the disintegration of tehzeeb and more, in real havelis and high-pillared corridors, and not fake, overdone sets, And amid all this was the love story of a bitterly dark Aazar Nawab (a dapper Kanwaljit Singh) and the delightfully spunky Aiman Shahab played by Deepika Deshpande who even without fake eyelashes, loud make up and gaudy sarees looked like the kind of a girl who could challenge and reform a rake.

***
The story had the intensity, tugs and hooks of a Mills & Boon romance. Only it was much better, layered as it was with the poetry, interesting dialects, the various colours of Urdu spoken by the aristocrats and those who worked for them and then there were the authentic locations, from forests to bungalows to havelis being converted into hotels to keep up with the times. Everything rang true and it flowed without investing any worry in whether the audience would take to the story, its pace, its zubaan or its characters, some of whom were unapologetically unglamorous. And yet, here we are, still remembering it all these years later because it did not dumb down or sell out its vision. Because it aspired to be a classic and became one.”….

For MORE follow the LINK

“Heroes, Gundas, Vamps & Good Girls”- Hindi Pulp Cover-Art by Shelle

Lindsay Pereira’s (Mid-Day) piece on the above mentioned post-card book

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He decides what women with paanch pati will look like-

“Why send a drab email when you can send a deliciously outlandish postcard dripping with suspense, blood, sex and tragedy, ripped from a collection titled Heroes, Gundas, Vamps and Good Girls inspired by Hindi pulp fiction covers. Here’s why North India can’t get enough of Shelle’s cleavage-sporting chudails and Haryanvi ghouls

“He goes by the pseudonym Shelle a derivative of the Hindi word for style. It was suggested by friends because his name, Mustajab Ahmed Siddiqui, takes up too much room. For people of North India, his work is more familiar than they think; they have had around 40 years to get acquainted with it.

Shelle’s name accosts them when they walk into railway stations across the country. Every bookstore they pass showcases his work in bold, because his are the covers adorning most action-packed Hindi pulp novels.

Without his brush, bestselling Hindi writers like Anil Mohan, Ved Prakash Sharma and Surender Mohan Pathak would have far poorer sales.

Now, thanks to Chennai-based Blaft Publications, Shelle can find a new audience. For Rs 295, we all have a chance to take a closer look at some of his cover art through Heroes, Gundas, Vamps & Good Girls, a collection of 25 postcards”…

For MORE follow the LINK

Apex’s thoughts- From ‘Vicky Cristina Barcelona’ to ‘Cocktail’ –the ‘menage-a- trois’ Bollywood conundrum

 

Apex left it is a comment here but I decided to make it into a separate post.

 

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I have liked both these flicks a lot but let me clarify that neither of them is very ‘significant’ or ‘great’. Infact neither of them are even worthy of lengthy debates and dissection of minutiae. What did catch my attention is the way Cocktail got misinterpreted, dissed and maligned without even being given a chance. Of course, Vicky Christina Barcelona (VCB) wasn’t exactly the same film (though similar and some would be indignified at this comparison), but VCB was spared a similar plight because of the names associated with it ( Woody Allen) and the unmistakable ‘subservience’ of Bollywood commentators about most Hollywood products especially the one with big names. I may come to VCB separately in a different post maybe (if mood permits), but lets tackle the Bollywood variant/manifestation called Cocktail directed by Homi Adjania, co-written and produced by Imtiaz Ali.

What will happen if Woody allen makes a film for Bollywood audience and sensibilities? Not sure of the product but am sure of the result—‘failure’ on the box office front (the same critics who laugh at cocktail may be more lenient there though).
Cocktail brings together some very interesting influences and to appreciate this, it is important to get down from the ‘intellectual high-horses’ and exit atleast briefly the domains of pseudo-intellectual ghettos one finds peace and reassurance in!
Even within this much-maligned ‘rom-com’ llght genre, it is much easier to defend a VCB than a Cocktail! So expectedly, I shall choose the more difficult job. Infact, most will even find this comparison to Allen ‘misplaced’ or even ‘outrageous’. I am aware that some of the readers who requested me to write this are not aware of the conventional ‘Bollywood traditions’. To understand the nuances, to the uninitiated, a prelude of the influences that go into this film—

READ MORE HERE

Image from Polanski’s “Venus in Fur”

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Roman Polanski‘s new film Venus in Fur, which is based on the play by David Ives and centers on an actress’ attempts to convince a director she’s perfect for a role in his upcoming production.

The film is set to play in competition at Cannes this year and the last time Polanski held such an honor was in 2002 where his film, The Pianist, went on to win the Palme d’Or.

Along with Polanski’s wife, Emmanuelle Seigner, the film co-stars Mathieu Amalric and was shot entirely in French.

Image from “The Congress” (Director is Ari Folman of ‘Waltz with Bashir’ fame)

Anurag Kashyap is also one of the co-producers of the film. It premiers at Cannes this year and it seems to be another feather in Kashyap’s cap. Since Waltz With Bashir is one of the finest and profoundest animation films to have ever been made anywhere this one too seems to be a compulsive watch. This part-animation, part live-action film is based on Stanisław Lem’s novel, The Futurological Congress, from 1971

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Synopsis :

Robin Wright (Robin Wright) receives an offer from Miramount to be scanned. In this way, her alias can be freely exploited in all films the Hollywood major decides to produce, even the most downmarket ones, the ones she has turned down until now. For 20 years she disappears to return as guest of honor at the Miramount-Nagasaki Convention in a  transformed world of fantastical appearances.

Image from Anurag Kashyap’s ‘Ugly’ (Updated)

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Kashyap has said that the film is essentially a simple kidnap drama but which also deals with a lot of things- relationships, our patriarchal system, how men look at women, domestic violence…. basically a very personal drama in the shape of a thriller. The film has been selected for Cannes Directors’ Fortnight section this year. It releases sometime at the end of the year only after he finishes shooting for Bombay Velvet. Ugly stars Ronit Roy, Rahul Bhatt (not Mahesh Bhatt’s son but a TV actor), Tejaswini Kolhapure (Padmini’s sister, you might remember her from Paanch), Siddhant Kapoor (Shakti Kapoor’s son), Girish Kulkarni (the famous Marathi director of Deool, Velu and Vihir) and Vipin Sharma. It has been written and directed by Kashyap himself.

Remembering Anthony Gonsalves- Naresh Fernandes on the ‘original’ Anthony

LINK

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MIDWAY through Manmohan Desai’s classic 1977 film about three brothers separated at birth, a man in a top hat and a Saturday Night Fever suit leaps out of a giant Easter egg to inform the assemblage, ‘My name is Anthony Gonsalves.’

The significance of the announcement was lost under the impact of Amitabh Bachchan’s sartorial exuberance. But decades later, the memory of that moment still sends shivers down the spines of scores of ageing men scattered across Bombay and Goa. By invoking the name of his violin teacher in that tune in Amar Akbar Anthony, the composer Pyarelal had finally validated the lives of scores of Goan Catholic musicians whose working years had been illuminated by the flicker of images dancing across white screens in airless sound studios, even as acknowledgement of their talent whizzed by in the flash of small-type credit titles.

The arc of their stories – determined by the intersection of passion and pragmatism, of empire and exigency – originated in church-run schools in Portuguese Goa and darted through royal courts in Rajasthan, jazz clubs in Calcutta and army cantonments in Muree. Those lines eventually converged on Bombay’s film studios, where the Goan Catholic arrangers worked with Hindu music composers and Muslim lyricists in an era of intense creativity that would soon come to be recognised as the golden age of Hindi film song.

The Nehruvian dream could not have found a more appropriate harmonic expression.

A few months back, a friend called to tell me about a new character he’d discovered in a story published by Delhi-based Raj Comics: Anthony Gonsalves. On the page (and accessible only if you read Hindi), Anthony Gonsalves is part of the great Undead, the tribe doomed to live between the worlds. It wasn’t always like this. In his prime, Anthony Gonsalves was a mild-mannered guitar player who had devised a magical new sound known as ‘crownmusic’. But his jealous rivals tortured him to death so that they could steal his work. Now, the magnificently muscled superhero emerges from the grave each night to prevent the desperate from committing suicide and to rid the world of evil, informed of imminent misfortune by his pet crow….

FOR MORE FOLLOW THE LINK